4/23/2020 | 1 MINUTE READ

Evonik Launches 3D Printing Software Tool Based on Castor Technology

Evonik has announced its first software tool for 3D printing. The new software has been developed by Castor, an Israeli start-up in which Evonik’s Venture Capital invested in late 2019.

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Evonik has announced its first software tool for 3D printing, said to help manufacturers save costs by choosing the right additive manufacturing process depending on geometry, material and financial analysis of the part being designed. The new software has been developed by Castor, an Israeli start-up in which Evonik’s Venture Capital invested in late 2019.

Castor’s software technology assesses a part’s printability, recommends the best printing material and estimates its cost and lead time. The technology helps manufacturers decide if and how to apply 3D printing to their production processes. Evonik has helped Castor to establish the software as a platform accessible for all industries. With Evonik’s software based on Castor technology, customers now have the opportunity to identify parts that could be printed with materials such as high-performance polymer powders and filaments. Evonik also produces a full range of additives that can modify material properties, for example, improving the flow ability or making the finished part more robust.

The start-up’s software is said to be complementary to computer-aided design (CAD) solutions and customers can analyse their existing CAD files of large assemblies or of many single parts, simultaneously. The software performs a comprehensive technical and economic analysis which results in a simple report showing the break-even point for additive manufacturing versus traditional manufacturing methods. This allows manufacturers to decide whether to prefer 3D printing over traditional manufacturing methods, leading to cost reduction and time savings.

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