Timothy W. Simpson Paul Morrow Professor of Engineering Design & Manufacturing

Timothy W. Simpson Paul Morrow Professor of Engineering Design & Manufacturing

Dr. Timothy W. Simpson is the Paul Morrow Professor of Engineering Design & Manufacturing at Penn State University, as well as the co-director of the Center for Innovative Materials Processing through Direct Digital Deposition (CIMP-3D). He is a regular contributor to Additive Manufacturing, and writes the monthly Additive Insights column for Modern Machine Shop.


AM Technology

Combining Additive and Subtractive Processes for Hybrid Manufacturing

At this point, we are still learning how to combine the two to optimize hybrid manufacturing.

AM Technology

Additive Manufacturing with Wire

This system has the benefits of cheaper cost and easier handling. But there can be some drawbacks as well.

AM Technology

Three Cool Uses for Directed Energy Deposition

Most machining professionals don’t like to admit that they ever make mistakes, but every now and then wouldn’t it be nice to have an “eraser” to go back and repair a gouge or fix a nicked edge? Or maybe you took off a bit too much material on that last machining pass and you’d like to add it back? Well, directed energy deposition (DED) enables you to do that and more.

Basics

What Is Directed Energy Deposition?

Analyzing directed energy deposition and powder-bed fusion provides a thorough understanding of the extra machining necessary for a “near-net shape” versus a “net shape” manufacturing process.

AM Technology

Additive Manufacturing for Large Parts

Powder-bed fusion is driving the hype for additive manufacturing right now, but it may not be the best answer. Directed energy deposition is a strong contender.

Postprocessing

Options for Finishing and Postprocessing Metal 3D-Printed Parts

There is a host of technologies available for finishing and postprocessing your AM parts. This column identifies options beyond machining.

Basics

Can My Machine Tool Access My Support Structures?

Analyzing the machinability of support structures opens a new way of thinking about optimal build orientation.

Basics

Understanding Surface Finish of Metal 3D-Printed Parts

Additive manufacturing imposes inherent manufacturing and design challenges that impact the dimensions and tolerances that you can (or cannot) achieve on an “as built” part.

Basics

How Machining Support Structures Affects the Cutting Tool

Studies show that thin-walled additively manufactured support structures may be more challenging to machine than they might appear.

Metal AM

How Machinable Are Support Structures in a Metal 3D-Printed Part?

What happens when you cut away thin-walled supports on your metal 3D-printed part?

Basics

Finding the Value Proposition for Additive Manufacturing

Why would anyone want to use additive manufacturing?

Postprocessing

Postprocessing Steps and Costs for Metal 3D Printing

When your metal part is done 3D printing, you just pull it out of the machine and start using it, right? Not even close.