| 1 MINUTE READ

Ultimaker S5 Desktop 3D Printer Enables Print Core Swap in Seconds

Rapid 2019: The Ultimaker S5 desktop 3D printer combines dual extrusion, advanced connectivity and an open filament system to make 3D printing accessible for more applications.
#prototyping

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Designed to run continuously and maximize uptime, the Ultimaker S5 desktop 3D printer combines dual extrusion, advanced connectivity and an open filament system to make 3D printing accessible for more applications, the company says

The Ultimaker S5 features a build volume measuring 330 × 240 × 300 mm (13" × 9.4" × 11.8"). The Ultimaker S5 print head’s capacitive sensor scans the build plate at multiple points and compensates for any tiny variations in its surface by adjusting the Z-axis height in a print’s first layers, enhancing adhesion.

Glass doors help control airflow inside the printer and aid print quality. An anodized aluminum build plate is said to give a more reliable 3D printing experience for engineering materials and a more consistent surface finish on the base of the model.

A filament flow sensor detects and notifies the user if the filament needs to be replenished during a print. Users can still finish a print even if they run out of material, increasing efficiency.

The 3D printer also features dual extrusion, enabling printing in two materials or colors. Users can print with nylon, CPE, or PLA combined with water-soluble PVA support material, then simply dissolve away the supports to leave a flawless surface finish, the company says.

Material-matching print cores with built-in EEPROM chips are auto-detected by the printer, minimizing downtime during configuration. Print cores can be exchanged in seconds to switch from a build and support material combination to dual-color 3D printing.

RELATED CONTENT

  • 3D Printing Impacts Production Mold Design

    3D-printed cavities and cores serve as a testing ground to quickly prove out production mold design options.

  • The Aircraft Imperative

    Reduce cost, reduce weight—to the extent that additive manufacturing can do these things, it represents a promising method for making aircraft parts. While important constraints currently prevent additive manufacturing from seeing more widespread use in aircraft production, these constraints might not be what you think. Here is a look at additive manufacturing within Boeing.

  • 3D Printing’s Expanding Role

    By providing solid prototypes of proposed part designs, one company has saved enough money in avoided rework to pay for its new 3D printer several times over.