8/27/2015

Software Add-On Helps Create Support Structures

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Netfabb, a subsidiary of FIT AG, has released Support Structures, an add-on to its NetFabb 6 suite of software for 3D printing and additive manufacturing.

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Netfabb, a subsidiary of FIT AG, has released Support Structures, an add-on to its NetFabb 6 suite of software for 3D printing and additive manufacturing. The add-on enables users to easily add support lattices and structures to parts. Two versions are offered: DLP Support Structures supports use on digital light processing (DLP) machines, and Enhanced Support Structures is designed for selective laser melting (SLM), stereolithography (SLA) and fused deposition modeling (FDM) machines.

Users can create bar, polyline and full-volume support structures using the add-on, and different support types can be combined on the same model. Curved and ramified bars, structured walls and other specialized supports can be created as needed.  Automatic downskin analysis of data models helps to determine which areas require support structures. Additional features include a transparent part view and an overview list of all used supports to enable quick re-use.

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