5/1/2014

Partnership Will Develop Large-Scale AM System

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The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is partnering with machine tool manufacturer Cincinnati Inc. to develop a large-scale additive manufacturing system.

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The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is partnering with machine tool manufacturer Cincinnati Inc. to develop a large-scale additive manufacturing system capable of printing polymer components as much as 10 times larger than can currently be produced and at speeds 200 to 500 times faster than existing additive machines.

Their cooperative research and development agreement is intended to support the DoE’s Clean Energy Manufacturing initiative to increase the efficiency of U.S. manufacturing and continue the development of innovative technologies. A prototype machine is in development that incorporates AM technology with the machine base of Cincinnati Inc.’s gantry-style laser cutting system. The research team then plans to integrate a high-speed cutting tool, pellet feed mechanism and control software for additional capabilities.

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