1/10/2014

Nylon Material for Additive Manufacturing Resists Breakage

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Stratasys offers its FDM Nylon 12 material designed for its Fortus 3D production systems.

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Stratasys offers its FDM Nylon 12 material designed for its Fortus 3D production systems. According to the company, the material resists breaking and offers improved impact strength, enabling the creation of tougher, more flexible unfilled nylon parts using its fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology. The nylon is designed for manufacturers in aerospace, automotive, home appliance and consumer electronics industries and is said to enable easy creation of durable parts that can stand up to high vibration, repetitive stress or fatigue. It is suitable for end-use parts such as interior panels and covers as well as tools, manufacturing aids, and jigs and fixtures. The material is available for the Fortus 360, 400 and 900 systems.

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