1/20/2014 | 1 MINUTE READ

EnvisionTEC Large-Format Printer Uses Photocure Technology

Originally titled 'Large-Format Printer Uses Photocure Technology'
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EnvisionTEC’s Xede 3SP large-format 3D printer uses the company’s scan, spin and selectively photocure (3SP) technology to quickly produce accurate parts from STL files, regardless of geometric complexity.

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EnvisionTEC’s Xede 3SP large-format 3D printer uses the company’s scan, spin and selectively photocure (3SP) technology to quickly produce accurate parts from STL files, regardless of geometric complexity. According to the company, the surface quality of the printed parts shows no signs of stairstepping on the inner and outer surfaces.

The machine had been part of the company’s Perfactory family of 3D printers that use digital light processing (DLP) technology. The new 3SP approach, which allows for larger build sizes, employs a multi-cavity laser diode with an orthogonal mirror spinning at 20,000 rpm. Light is reflected through a spinning drum and goes through a series of optical elements, thereby focusing the light onto the surface of the photopolymer across the Y axis. The imaging light source, which contains the laser diode, its driver and all optics, travels in the X axis at 1"-2" per sec. (material dependent) as the light is scanning in the Y direction and selectively photocuring the polymer based on the path data set.

The Xede 3SP system can be used to produce everything from concept models to functional parts with minimal material waste. It features a stand-alone PC that enables it to work independently from the pre-processing workstation, but it also can connect directly to another workstation or be integrated into a network for pre-processing of job files and for remote monitoring.

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