10/20/2014

AMT Founds International AM Award

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This new award will recognize innovations in additive manufacturing for industrial applications.

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AMT–The Association For Manufacturing Technology and VDW (German Machine Tool Builders’ Association) plan to recognize innovations in additive manufacturing for industrial applications with the International Additive Manufacturing Award, beginning in 2015. Such innovations are expected to include developments in the design of systems or major components, advances in processes or materials, new applications, data generation, or measurement.

The winner of the first award, which will be announced in March at the 2015 MFG Meeting in Orlando, Florida, will receive a $20,000 cash prize and a media package valued at $80,000 to promote the winning development. In 2016, the award will be presented at METAV, the international fair for manufacturing technology and automation, in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Additive manufacturing system producers, users, component suppliers and data modelers, as well as international academia, are invited to apply for the award. Applications will be evaluated by an international jury comprised of representatives from industry, academia, the health sector, the media and trade associations.

Visit additive-award.com for more information.

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