7/6/2015

AM Machine Designed to Compete with Injection Molding

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An additive manufacturing machine in development at the University of Sheffield’s Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) is intended to compete with conventional injection molding for high-volume production.

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An additive manufacturing machine in development at the University of Sheffield’s Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) is intended to compete with conventional injection molding for high-volume production. Developers estimate that small components will be printed at a rate of less than 1 sec. per part, depending on size. The additive machine uses high-speed sintering (HSS) to selectively fuse polymer powder layer by layer. The process involves printing layers of infrared-absorbing ink onto a powder bed. Once printed, each layer is exposed to infrared light which heats the powder covered by the ink, causing it to fuse while the rest of the powder remains cool. The machine will be built in the AMRC before installation in the University’s Centre for Advanced Additive Manufacturing (AdAM).

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