10/18/2012

Additive and Subtractive Together

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At the recent International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago, EOS and machine tool maker GF AgieCharmilles demonstrated additive and subtractive processes working together to produce a titanium tibial tray for knee implants.

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At the recent International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago, EOS and machine tool maker GF AgieCharmilles demonstrated additive and subtractive processes working together to produce a titanium tibial tray for knee implants. Software from Within Technologies modeled the part, including its elaborate surface geometry. An EOS direct metal laser sintering machine then built several identical pieces in one cycle, which were separated on a GF AgieCharmilles CUT 20P wire EDM machine. The same company’s Mikron HPM 450U machining center completed the process by milling critical surfaces. Learn more at short.mmsonline.com/agieeos.

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