8/17/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Siemens Successfully 3D Prints Combustion Component for SGT-A05

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The 3D-printed DLE pre-mixer for an aeroderivative gas turbine showed potential for reduced CO emissions in engine testing. 

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Siemens reports that it successfully 3D-printed and engine tested a dry low emission (DLE) pre-mixer for the SGT-A05 aeroderivative gas turbine, with the results showing a potential for significant reductions in CO emissions. 

"This is another excellent example of how additive manufacturing is revolutionizing our industry, delivering measurable benefits and real value to our customers, particularly as they look to further reduce emissions to meet environmental targets," says Vladimir Navrotsky, chief technology officer for Siemens Power Generation Services, Distributed Generation. "Our achievements using AM are paving the way for greater agility in the design, manufacturing and maintenance of power generation components."

The benefits of using additive manufacturing to produce this particular gas turbine component include time savings and a reduced number of parts in the component. From concept to engine test, the development took only seven months. The DLE pre-mixer is highly complex with over 20 parts involved in the casting and assembly using traditional manufacturing methods. By utilizing Siemens qualified nickel super alloys as the AM printing material, the 3D-printed component requires only two parts and lead time is reduced by approximately 70 percent. 3D printing of the DLE pre-mixer allows Siemens to simplify complexity in the production process, reduce external dependencies in the supply chain, and improves the geometry of the component, thus allowing a better fuel-air mix.

The first engine testing of the AM-manufactured DLE pre-mixer, which was 3D-printed in Siemens' AM center of competence in Finspang, Sweden, was recently completed. The company reports that the test showed no start issues, all fuel transitions were accomplished successfully without any controls modifications required, there were no combustion dynamics or noise, measurable CO emissions reductions were realized and full power was achieved. 

Siemens' DLE solution for the SGT-A05 gas turbine reduces emissions through advanced lean burn combustion technology, eliminating the need for water injection. The DLE conversion reduces customers' operating costs associated with water treatment. Application of DLE does not compromise the high dynamic loading response of this aeroderivative engine model. More than 120 engines are successfully utilizing DLE technology to reduce NOx and CO emissions with 3.9 million operating hours accumulated (as of February 2018). ''And now, with AM technology we have an opportunity to go even further with emissions reduction for DLE combustion," says Douglas Willham, Siemens director of engineering for the SGT-A05.

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