9/10/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

Renishaw, Cobra Work to Optimize Design Process

Renishaw worked with Michigan-based Cobra Aero to improve the engine manufacturer’s design processes for aircraft and motorcycle engines.

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Renishaw, Cobra Work on AM Engine Design Optimization

Renishaw worked with Michigan-based Cobra Aero to improve the engine manufacturer’s design processes for aircraft and motorcycle engines. They found that a single part with complex lattice structures works better than the original design.

Renishaw worked with Michigan-based Cobra Aero to improve the engine manufacturer’s design processes for aircraft and motorcycle engines. After completing the project with Renishaw, Cobra Aero invested in an AM 400 system to increase its in-house additive manufacturing (AM) capabilities.

To optimize the design of its engine cylinders and to gain expertise in AM, Cobra Aero visited a Renishaw Additive Manufacturing Solutions Center. There they collaborated with Renishaw engineers to discover how AM could improve the design of a cylinder for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

Renishaw, Cobra Work on AM Engine Design Optimization

Renishaw, Cobra Work on AM Engine Design Optimization

Sean Hilbert, president of Cobra Aero, says: “Investing in AM allows us to develop tools and new products for high value, small volume applications, speed up the manufacturing process and produce designs that would not be possible using conventional subtractive machining.”

According to Renishaw, Cobra Aero was able to produce a single part with complex lattice structures using Renishaw’s laser powder bed fusion technology that performs better than one made with conventional manufacturing techniques.

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