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AddUp Moves North American HQs to Cincinnati Area

The U.S. subsidiary of AddUp is moving its North American headquarters to Blue Ash, Ohio, at the current location of AddUp’s other U.S. subsidiary, BeAM Inc.
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AddUp’s FormUp 350 is an industrial AM machine for producing individual parts, whether for regular production or as prototypes.

AddUp’s FormUp 350 is an industrial AM machine for producing individual parts, whether for regular production or as prototypes.

AddUp Inc., the U.S. subsidiary of AddUp, a global manufacturer of metal 3D printing equipment and supplier of 3D printed parts, is moving its North American headquarters to Blue Ash, Ohio, at the current location of AddUp’s other U.S. subsidiary, BeAM Inc. AddUp focuses on Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) technology, while BeAM focuses on Direct Energy Deposition (DED). The two companies will form one operating unit reporting to Ken Wright, currently president of both companies.

As part of its plan to centralize its operations in Blue Ash, AddUp will move machines and equipment from its operation in Greenville, South Carolina. The company will also create 25 new jobs and invest $12.5 million in Blue Ash over the next three years. This growth is being driven by the expansion of the metals 3D printing market along with increased investment in product development and sales channels on the part of AddUp’s investors, Michelin and French industrial group Fives.

The focus of the operation will be to provide 3D metal printing services for AddUp’s U.S. customers in the aerospace, defense, medical and tooling industries. Five of AddUp’s FormUp 350 printers will be added to the current inventory of BeAM’s Modulo 400 and Magic 800 printers, which will be available for printing services by the end of 2021. Plans are also in place for expansion in the coming years.

The location will also be used as a demonstration facility for the redesigned FormUp 350 and Module 400, their flagship PBF and DED 3D Printers, respectively, which will be launched in the U.S. sometime in 2021. The company says that these products will have expanded capabilities that advance metal 3D printing to the next level of performance.

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