8/31/2015

Additive Manufacturing Conference Speaker: Mark Norfolk

The Fabrisonic president will be one of the speakers at the October 20-21 conference in Knoxville, Tennessee, focusing on industrial applications of additive manufacturing.

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Fabrisonic will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

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The largest ultrasonic additive manufacturing machine has a work envelope of 6 by 6 by 3 feet. Developed by Fabrisonic, the machine is being built by Ultra Tech Machinery, another Ohio company.

Mark Norfolk, president at Fabrisonic, will be one of the speakers at the upcoming Additive Manufacturing Conference. His company makes an unusual additive manufacturing machine that builds parts without changing the state of the metal—read more here. The conference—October 20-21 in Knoxville, Tennessee—focuses on industrial applications of additive manufacturing. Learn more and register to attend at additiveconference.com.

And speaking of additive … our Additive Manufacturing brand is about to grow. Soon, we will launch a new website devoted to additive manufacturing for industrial applications, and we will expand the publication that began as a small supplement into a full-size magazine. All of this will happen later this year. For now, stay apprised of these and other additive developments (and also give us a little encouragement) by joining us as one of the earliest followers of Additive Manufacturing on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn

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